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Michael Prachensky

KUNST TRIFFT WISSENSCHAFT

COSMIC RAYS, PLASMA EXPLOSIONS, QUANTUM EFFECTS – MICHAEL PRACHENSKY THROWS EXPLOSIVE RED SLASHES OF COLOUR ON CANVASES TO CREATE AN EMOTIONAL UNDERSTANDING FOR A SCIENCE BEYOND OUR CURRENT IMAGINATION AND COMPREHENSION. THE ARCHITECT, ARTIST, VISIONARY, AND INTRANSIGENT THINKER CONSIDERS HIS CREATIVE PROCESS AS THE QUICKEST AND MOST EFFECTIVE INTERPRETATION OF A COMPLICATED PROCESS – A PROCESS WHOSE RESULTS WILL CHANGE LIVES AND WORLDS.

Soon, new materials will drastically change the way we build, create and save energy or how we move from A to B in a positive ground-breaking way. If we’re to believe the vision of the architect, artist, and unusual thinker from Tyrol, Michael Prachensky, and his partners at Trans-Tech GmbH & Co KG, then the industrialisation of polymer-fullerene is just around the corner. This nanotechnological carbon material features traits which would make even Harry Potter drop his wand in surprise! Light ESES (Environmentally Sound Energy Storage) batteries will provide electricity to entire housing grids or help e-cars clock thousands of kilometres without employing rare metals such as lithium or environmentally-damaging acids. Razor-thin, highly stable glass panel elements will change colour and transparency with the help of the polymers, turn into infrared low voltage heating tools or create all types of storable electricity using electromagnetic waves.

Beyond current deconstructivism.

‘If we give up insulation, heat insulation, insulation layers, and superficial protection like galvanisation and use trailblazing static traits at the same time, then fragile buildings beyond our wildest dreams of current deconstructivism will become reality,’ prophesises Prachensky and sees in architecture, his original profession, an area reflecting the ideal prerequisites for the first implementation of polymer-fullerene. Prototypes have already been tested and implemented whose immense potential is being continually confirmed by Professor Erich Gornik, PhD, from the Technical University of Vienna. Prachensky, partner and supervisor of the international research team, considers his a two-fold role. As an innovative thinker, he recognises, develops, and describes the framework surrounding these technologies: the effects of decentralised electric production and savings potential are, for example, barely discernible at the moment. Mega power plants, electric grids, overhead lines as well as using fossil fuels and all relevant infrastructure including petrol stations, gas pipes, oil refineries and drilling would become superfluous; even international structures and the wellbeing of countries would shift due to micro power plants and plasma reactors. Moreover, we’d have to recognise the need for new international and alternative traffic and urban planning projects leading the way into the future.’

My interdisciplinary thoughts unite science, research, architecture, and art.

The second task of the visionary from Tirol is to help people outside scientific circles understand the abovementioned science. Contrary to the classic concepts of mechanics and electricity which can be pictured as courses of water, these new technologies don’t align themselves to people’s imagination as we lack everyday experiences which can explain them. Quantum physics processes are, indeed, on everyone’s lips, however they oppose regular human understanding. That’s why we need to find another way of creating an emotional and visual comprehension to reach people, says Prachensky. In his most recent and extremely powerful large-format works he thematises energetic discharges in plasma reactors, cosmic rays, fragile (still) unthinkable buildings, amorphous glass temples, and energy in general. The works always feature a powerful red splash of colour, a red that Prachensky says is part of his family history and has a nearly transversal effect across generations, even if it’s used in completely different contexts. Art in Prachensky turns into a scientific language which would normally flee from human understanding and imagination and, consequently, flee from a deeper understanding of science itself. ‘I want to help people see these new technologies, help them touch and feel them. This is where my interdisciplinary approach works: science, research, architecture, and art are closely connected, art is the expressive form of technology, architecture is the expressive form of art,’ says the visionary. Architecture becomes lighter, more transparent, flexible and human – current technologies can’t achieve that yet. Moreover, the ecological demands of garden, hydro, wind, and aquaponic plants are integrated in the husks of the buildings.

Art, technology, and natural science – an artistic initial attempt at planning?

We should take some time to think about the tension but also the overlap between art and science. In Michael Prachensky’s works we see an interesting example reflected by the complex balance occurring between natural science, technology, and art. In this context, such an overlap can be associated with a new, enlightened school of thought. It’s an important drive for how we think in our modern times; moreover, Michael Prachensky says it has become his philosophical duty to explain these issues through art. The artist himself considers his works as the quickest and most effective form of interpretation for the complex process in the research lab in Saint Petersburg. The explosive red represents the unfathomable process in the plasma reactor, which turn carbon atoms into completely new, unnatural, but extremely stable ordered structures. From the explosion, the chaos, the entropy one obtains a nearly divine creation process following a new order, a new material with traits whose possibilities are as of yet unknown.

Without vision there is no future.

Science, architecture, and technology change, preaches Prachensky, ‘Innovation and creativity are original creative forces which belong to man, and they follow his quest for knowledge. I follow the urge to make ideas and visions comprehensible and even to implement them.’ The visionary, innovative thinker, architect, and artist calls his current theme ‘the time of its science, the science its art, the art its freedom.’ Not a casual title by far. It speaks of weaving together interdisciplinary perspectives and to develop a universal cooperation of humanistic and natural sciences with art.

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Lebt als freier Journalist, Autor und Inhaber einer gleichnamigen Werbeagentur in Innsbruck. Neben der Full-Service-Betreuung von Krankenhäusern schreibt er für namhafte Medien Reise- und Wissenschaftsreportagen.

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