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A COLLECTION FOR POSTERITY

CREATES A COLLECTION FOR POSTERITY PART 1 OF A SERIES

THE STRENGTHENING OF BANKING GOES HAND IN HAND WITH THE FLOURISHING OF THE ECONOMY AND THE GROWING WELLBEING IN THE YEARS FOLLOWING THE POSTWAR RECONSTRUCTION PERIOD. THE ‘SPARKASSE ZU INNSBRUCK’ INSTITUTION FOUNDED IN 1822 WAS THE FIRST OF ITS KIND IN TYROL. ITS AIM WAS TO DEDICATE ITSELF TO PROMOTING CULTURE, TO THE FORMATION OF SAVING ACCOUNTS, AND TO MAKE PROVISIONS FOR A VAST RAFT OF SOCIETAL CLASSES WHICH ALSO INCLUDED MANY TYROLEAN ARTISTS.

After all, artists and their art were the ones who had to fight the har­dest to estab­lish their place in socie­ty after over­co­m­ing the peri­od of ‘grea­test’ hardship and the return to nor­mal­cy. Poli­ti­cal­ly spea­king, we have to speak of and reco­gni­se the work of the region’s repre­sen­ta­ti­ve, Gott­fried Hohen­au­er. As Minis­ter for Cul­tu­re in the pro­vin­ce, he’d reco­gnis­ed the pre­ca­rious situa­ti­on of an art picking its­elf back up on its feet. He ensu­red first steps were taken with finan­cial aid poli­ci­es to deve­lop art which, after the ‘blood and anguish‘ of the war, cros­sed the thres­hold into an unpre­ce­den­ted peri­od of MODERN art which was initi­al­ly trea­ted with hor­ror and rejec­tion. By imple­men­ting the 2% con­di­ti­ons for public buil­dings, poli­tics suc­cee­ded in pro­vi­ding finan­cial aid for the deve­lo­p­ment and per­so­nal exis­tence of artists as well as enga­ging with art in public spaces. For artists born after 1910 such as Ger­hild Dies­ner, Gott­fried Fuetsch, Inge Höck, Wil­fried Kirschl, Elmar Kopp, Jos Pir­kner, Hel­mut Rehm, Oswald Hal­ler and espe­cial­ly Max Wei­ler (to name just the most important repre­sen­ta­ti­ves) doors were ope­ned that, in hind­sight, can be per­cei­ved as inte­res­ting artis­tic and his­to­ri­cal elements.

Max Wei­ler, who spar­ked abso­lu­te hor­ror in Inns­bruck with his fres­coes in the The­re­si­en­kir­che Church, on the Hun­ger­burg and in the train sta­ti­on, was pos­si­b­ly the god­f­a­ther of the mosaic pil­lar in the hall of the TIROLER SPARKASSE which, today, has plea­s­ant­ly, but unno­ti­ced by most peop­le, sur­vi­ved count­less reno­va­tions. ‘Like a land­s­cape,’ said Max Wei­ler about his mosaic built into the sur­face of the walls in the near­by Maria-The­re­si­en street. Artist RUDOLF KREUZER, some years youn­ger than him, was only known by few as an excel­lent mosaic pain­ter, and could show his skills off here as well as on the faca­de of the Rauch-Fut­ter buil­ding in Hall. Bes­i­des the wealth of works that the artists left behind in public spaces such as mosaics, sgraf­fi­tos, glass, and other tech­ni­ques, more manu­al works on paper or can­vas also play just as an important role. The estab­lish­ment of insti­tu­ti­ons such as the Tiro­ler Künst­ler­schaft, but espe­cial­ly the foun­da­ti­on of the regio­nal Gal­le­ry in the Taxis Palais as well as the gro­wing inte­rest in exhi­bi­ti­ons led to the gro­wing awa­reness about artists who had, in the time being, beco­me estab­lis­hed. Slow­ly but steadi­ly, a com­pe­ti­ti­on star­ted being deve­lo­ped in banks during the ‘60s which spe­cia­li­sed in purcha­sing works of art, most­ly as exhi­bi­ti­ons. The TIROLER SPARKASSE foresaw the­se prac­ti­ces and crea­ted a collec­tion fea­turing a spe­ci­fic type of the­me, name­ly ‘Tyro­lean art of the post-war peri­od‘ cura­ted by an expert jury and, over the cour­se of the years, the­se collec­tions grew and grew. The exem­pla­ry cata­lo­guing as well as the expert archi­ving of tho­se works which were not exhi­bi­ted in the offices and weren’t meant for the public’s eyes occur­red bet­ween 2004 and 2008.

With the slo­gan ‘Art is our most important asset and heri­ta­ge. art con­veys values and fee­lings and is a medi­um to express what lan­guage can­not say‘ (Peter Tief­entha­ler) the young genera­ti­on of Tiro­ler Spar­kas­se workers fol­low an open poli­cy inves­ting in invol­ving their cli­ents in shaping an unpu­blis­hed collec­tion. The inten­ti­on of ‘being open’ will be imple­men­ted by run­ning publi­ca­ti­ons and prin­ting pic­tures in the MILIONART art maga­zi­ne, an art maga­zi­ne with a twist, who­se crea­ti­on is of utmost impor­t­ance to the Tiro­ler Spar­kas­se and espe­cial­ly the PRIVATE BANKING depart­ment. Knowing that cer­tain regu­lar cli­ents enthu­se about art and exci­ting publi­ca­ti­ons on art, the first attempt at this pro­ject will be kicked off by the fol­lowing con­cept: PAUL FLORA, just like WILFRIED KIRSCHL is one of the most important ‘insti­tu­ti­ons’ of the coun­try. A natio­nal tre­a­su­re, if you will. Known for being an out­stan­ding art publi­cist, art mana­ger and pro­mo­ter and an artist, tog­e­ther with Ger­hild Dies­ner he revo­lu­tio­nis­ed the artis­tic bor­ders of Tyrol. They both enga­ged with the French avant­gar­de move­ment by par­ti­ci­pa­ting in the acti­vi­ties of the Alli­an­ce Fran­cia­se. Kirschl remains true to his choice of sub­jects with his land­s­capes and still life. He mana­ges to cap­tu­re uni­que and unmistaka­ble snapshots by redu­cing ever­y­day objects as well as sou­thern impres­si­ons to geo­metric basic forms that always depict sce­nes with ele­gan­ce, refi­ned disci­pli­ne and an unusu­al ele­gan­ce and feel for colour.

Back then only Erich Käs­t­ner cer­ti­fied that his friend PAUL FLORA ‘made unble­mis­hed white somehow reach its full poten­ti­al’, years later we have to admit he was right. Flora‘s ‘sharp quill’, his pen­cils and even his etching need­les move in a pla­ne bet­ween cool linea­ri­ty and gra­ded nuan­ces of grey. In the obtai­ned con­trast he finds a tool to make things ali­ve, that allows the drawing to acqui­re a cer­tain je ne sais quoi of a pain­ting. His fan­tasti­cal thoughts stee­ped in rea­li­ty, cri­ti­cal and often curious depic­tions are wit­nes­ses to how much joy pain­ting gives him. Dis­creet colours are what cha­rac­te­ri­se con­tem­pora­ry artists MAURIZIO BONATO and VERONIKA GERBER. Focu­sed on the choice of their still life sub­jects, we come across her poe­tic and nar­ra­ti­ve sides in one of her ear­ly works. Cap­tu­ring ‘nor­mal objects‘ is in con­trast with the artis­tic path repre­sen­ted by ori­en­tal phi­lo­so­phy used by Bona­to in his near­ly medi­ta­ti­ve HUANGHE, Yel­low River impres­si­ons from 1989.

The 68 cm big bron­ze sculp­tu­re from the Meta­morps­ho­sen Zyklus, Figur I, com­ple­ted in 1991 by GEORG LOEWIT is part of the rela­tively small sculp­tu­ral collec­tion. The golds­mith, pain­ter and sculp­tor was espe­cial­ly acti­ve in public spaces and he seems to gift his abs­tract huma­no­id figu­res, cove­r­ed in green, with arms. Thanks to their own strength they crea­te chan­ge, a chan­ge which brings us to a logi­cal result, embo­di­ed by his latest figures.

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Studium der Kunstgeschichte in Innsbruck. Philosophische Dissertation über die Geschichte der Tiroler Glasmalerei- und Mosaikanstalt und deren Mosaike im Stadtgebiet von Innsbruck. Kurzzeitige Mitarbeit am Tiroler Kunstkataster. Als Ausstellungskuratorin und Autorin von Kunstmonografien und zahlreichen kunstpublizistischen Beiträgen u.a. für Ausstellungskataloge tätig.

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