• German
  • English
 

Rubens‘ Muses

HIS LIFE WAS ALL AGLITTER

AANTWERP, 2 JUNE 1640. A GOOD 60 TORCHES FLICKER TO THE SOUND OF THE STOMPING FEET OF A FUNERARY PROCESSION. A CROWN IS PLACED ON A BLACK VELVET CUSHION ON THE FRONT OF THE COFFIN. THE APPEAL OF MODERN TIMES IS ACCOMPANIED BY ETERNAL LIFE WITH A TINKLING TUNE. HELENA PROCEEDS BEHIND THE COFFIN, DONNING THE BLACK CLOTHES WORN ON THESE MOURNFUL OCCASIONS, THE YOUNG WIDOW OF THE ‘MOST COVETED MAN IN EUROPE’, CARRYING THE 7TH CHILD OF PIETRO PAOLO RUBENS IN HER WOMB. MARIA CONSTANTIA ALBERTINA WILL BE BORN 8 MONTHS FOLLOWING THE FUNERAL, BECOMING A NUN AT 16 TO FREE THE ARTISTIC WILL OF HER FATHER, SPREADING IT ACROSS THE WORLD.

Rubens, the ban­ner of the Coun­ter Refor­ma­ti­on, the son of evan­ge­li­cal migrants, to boot, was more than a geni­us: Rubens is a phe­no­me­non. Mil­lion­aire, huma­nist, phi­lo­so­pher, diplo­mat, secret agent, tac­ti­ci­an, stra­te­gist, pedago­gist, secreta­ry of the Regent, mer­chant, owner of a com­pa­ny, man of finan­ce and bon viveur, awar­ded the adoub­ment of knight not once, but twice, owner of a cast­le. And the most famous pain­ter of his time. Abso­lu­tism, feu­da­lism, mercan­ti­lism fought each other in a bloo­dy batt­le ever sin­ce Euro­pe had dis­co­ve­r­ed the New World. Rubens went loo­king for a second Euro­pean Renais­sance in the soul of the clas­sic, a new Euro­pe employ­ing the tools of art and colours, brush and nib.

SEDES FORTUNAE ROTUNDAE SUNT 

WHO IS RUBENS?
ART deri­ves from know­ledge, know­ledge is plea­su­re, and art deri­ves from favour. Gua­ran­tee and main­tain: the skill of the muses is embo­di­ed by beau­ty. If the muses love an artist, then they give away a moment of hap­pi­ness. Rubens, like many other peop­le, cap­tu­red their atten­ti­on, and has been giving back to the world to this very day. The pain­ter is a ser­vant of the spark of good luck in a gaze in a spe­ci­fic moment. He tri­es to keep it, that gaze, making the most of the power chan­nel­led in the exchan­ge of gazes. This is the bridge bet­ween the inner and outer worlds, Ruben’s eyes are our eyes, and we look into the eyes, that saw him and that see us. Rubens paints us with spar­k­ling eyes.

NOMEN EST OMEN
The 6th child of Jan Rubens and Maria Pipe­lincks, from noble fami­lies in Ant­werp, the then ‘nort­hern Rome’, was born in Sie­gen in West­fa­len on 28 June, appar­ent­ly after mid­ni­ght, becau­se he was bap­ti­sed Peter and Paul, the patron of the 29th June. His desti­ny was desti­ned to Rome from the very start. RUBENS in Jewish means ‘Oh LOOK, a son!’. See­ing is the gift of Jacob’s first son (PPR was also, logi­cal­ly, inter­red in Saint Jacob’s church). ‘RU’ also sounds like ‘Ruach’, the divi­ne halo. ‘Rubeo’ in Latin means: to beco­me red, thri­ve on life. The rose announ­ces this. Red is also life­b­lood. You can inter­pret that as a ‘blosso­m­ing’ red. Cho­sen peop­le don’t need a name and sur­na­me. Like Titi­an, Leo­nar­do, Michel­an­ge­lo, Kep­ler, Pla­to, etc.

RUBEN’S MUSES
The first spark in an exchan­ge of loving gazes is a wit­ness to a next life. Love is chan­nel­led via the eyes. And this mee­ting is repeated with infants. A loving gaze trans­mits life. A new­ly born infant sees the world and light for the very first time by exch­an­ging gazes with whoever holds him. The love of a loving gaze car­ri­es future life until phy­si­cal death. The pain­ter can keep this gaze ali­ve even cen­tu­ries after he’s dead. We can assu­me that PPR saw the loving gaze of his MOTHER Maria first, then that of his father, his bro­ther Phil­ipp. We find the­se first gazes in his pic­tures, time and again. The fami­ly lived in exi­le, the father had escaped death in pri­son, and ever­yo­ne would have bent over the new-born, eyes aglit­ter. Maria Pipe­lincks, a nove­list, was respon­si­ble for the fami­ly for­tu­ne. Inde­ed, the mother was PPR’s first muse. Her love accom­pa­nied him even after her death, for his who­le life. The unknown muse of puber­ty struck PPR: Mar­gue­ri­te de Ligne-Aren­berg, daugh­ter of a Vlies­rit­ter, widow, may have bes­to­wed her gaze, that of a 37-year-old woman, upon him. She loved him like her own son. Italy’s real and pain­ted muses fil­led Rubens’ eyes with a spar­k­ling ado­ra­ti­on. Rubens pro­gres­sed to beco­me a pain­ter of the most spar­k­ling eyes in the who­le world. The anci­ent values and Renais­sance are here and now! This is life! This is colour!

PPR is pain­ting it! After the death of his beloved mother he mar­ried ISABELLA BRANT, the nie­ce of his bro­ther. The muse with slan­ted, ori­en­tal eyes in Ant­werp. The woman of his life! Ruben builds her an Ita­li­an palace in Ant­werp. She gives birth to child­ren with spar­k­ling eyes. Rubens blossoms, the son born in the sign of can­cer has a fami­ly, this is the rebirth of the Renais­sance. The citi­zen beco­mes a prince. The craft­s­man beco­mes court pain­ter, minis­ter. After 17 hap­py years of mar­ria­ge, Isa­bel­la dies, struck down by the pla­gue. PPR tra­vels as a diplo­mat across Euro­pe, to pro­mo­te the unity of the Nether­lands. He would never reach this goal of his life.

Rubens has now been knigh­ted by two rival kings, a 53-year-old pain­ter in Euro­pe, and has mar­ried once again, this time to the 17-year-old HELENE Fourment, with light gol­den hair which embo­dies the idea of beau­ty as inter­pre­ted by the Vene­ti­an mas­ter, Titi­an. She lived with PPR in Cast­le Ste­hen, and once again, he was bles­sed with child­ren. He bequea­thed her the ‘Venus im Pelz’. She was the pregnant muse, she fol­lo­wed Rubens’ cof­fin across Ant­werp. She had made her man blossom again, wal­king in the cent­re of art, the hap­pi­ness of muses, eyes that Ruben gave to the world. He loo­ked at beau­ty, and pain­ted the most beau­ti­ful eyes, and this gave the gift of the muses to ever­yo­ne. The engi­ne of love. Eter­nal hap­pi­ness in a sin­gle moment. Rubens found that in the spar­k­ling gaze of his beloved, of his children.

The child with the gol­den curls on the exter­nal side of the Ilde­fon­so altar reaches for the branch with the two app­les: the apple of his eye, that are given to ever­yo­ne, as a gift of life. The spark in tho­se eyes is eter­nal. Rubens pain­ted hap­pi­ness. The uni­fi­ca­ti­on of his home, a riven Nether­lands, he repre­sen­ted that as a sym­bo­lof hope in his ‘Gewit­ter­land­schaft’: a rain­bow cros­sing the crevice. Bot­tom left, in the Vien­na pain­ting. The arch of Irish, the bridge of the gods’ mes­sen­ger, the  colours of light, with which Rubens crea­ted pre­sent and future, the seven colours he used to crea­te all his work, with his eyes. Tho­se are the eyes that meet us from Tizi­ans ‘Nymph and She­pard’ – it’s the muse! – from the gol­den age of peace. Burs­t­ing with love and hap­pi­ness. Rubens take it, and gives it the glit­te­ring gran­deur it deserves.

Share Post
Written by

geb. 1959 in Wien ist akad. Bildhauer, Maler, Kurator, Schriftsteller und Erfinder der Diamant-Kaltnadelradierung, und gilt als bedeutender Grafiker. Sein 2005 erschienenes Buch „The Complete Graphik Work“ erhielt die Auszeichnung „Schönstes Buch der Welt“. Seine Arbeiten sind in den bedeutendsten internationalen Museen und Sammlungen vertreten. Er befaßt sich praktisch und theoretisch mit bildender Kunst im Kontext zur Natur, besonders in der Renaissance und im Barock.

Shopping Cart
There are no products in the cart!
Continue Shopping
0